Let's Talk About It

Articles for discussion in the Let's Talk about it session. 

 

Use your imagination

When we are children growing up, our imagination is the key to untold worlds.  And it has been shown that kids with very active imaginations are more likely to dream and strive for greater things as adults.

 

2017 08 16 informationoverload

Modern life is so noisy nowadays, it is the noisiest it has ever been in history, and with noise, many sounds are filtered out. As a result we could end up missing some of the most important things in life. This can have far reaching implications, and is aptly known as “overstimulation.”

Forget your smartphone, and your i7 chip set, the brain in your skull is the most efficient processor the world has ever known, capable of processing stimuli from a variety of sources, but sometimes it can all become too much. 

 

burnout 

Could fun and laughter be an antidote to burnout?

When you think of burnout, what is the first thing that comes to mind?  Maybe horror images of someone so burnt out that they become a vegetable with no brain function left. Well, what if you were told that answer isn’t that far fetched?

When someone burns out, the brain’s emotional responses become suppressed, the brain can't cope any longer, and the person may well give the general impression of suddenly having a short fuse.

The simplest way to cure this is usually embarking on a well-earned break from the stresses of everyday life, but sometimes all we need is some fun and laughter to turn the universe back to how it was meant to be.

Here are a few ways that laughter and fun can help you to cure any symptoms of burnout.

 

Being self-critical is a great way to push yourself into being a better person. Perhaps you want to do your job better, or maybe you want to help other people. You may even want to yell less at your kids. When you critique yourself, you have the ability to make changes. But, can you go too far?

Reading comprehension 

Looking for clues

If you remember from last month's article: ‘reading’ means understanding the author’s message, not just calling out words? If you cannot answer comprehension questions after reading a page, you have not truly read anything.

There are specific reading-comprehension skills that will help you understand what you are reading. Whereas the last article focused on Main Idea, Predicting Outcomes, Inferences, and Fact or Opinion; this article will cover Context Clues, Cause and Effect, Drawing Conclusions, and Sequencing.

When reading be sure to ask yourself questions that reinforce these comprehension skills.

 Are you really reading

Are you really reading?

If you read every word on a page, are you really reading it? It might seem a strange question to ask, but the answer is even stranger: maybe you are, but maybe you're not!

One definition of the verb ‘to read’ is, “to utter aloud written matter”.  By using this definition alone, of course you are reading, but there is another definition (there are several), which says “to understand or interpret”. After reading a page, if you cannot answer questions about the material you just read, you really just uttered the words out loud. Yes, you have shown you know how to say the words, but you also need to understand the author’s message behind the words. If you can do that, you know you are truly reading.