THE numbers of golden eagles in Scotland could be boosted, reports The Independent.

The South of Scotland Golden Eagle Project has won £1.3 million funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and hopes to increase numbers in Dumfries and Galloway and the Scottish borders.

The paper says that there are now two to four pairs of golden eagles in the south of Scotland but a study has shown there is suitable habitat for between 10 and 16 breeding pairs.

Mark Oddy, chairman of the South of Scotland Golden Eagle Project, commented: “Golden eagles are arguably Scotland's most iconic species and this programme will ensure more of us can see these magnificent birds across the south of Scotland's skies.”

Over a four-year period from 2018, the scheme aims to introduce between five and 10 young eagles from the south, and single eagle chicks from the broods in the Highlands will also be raised and released at a hidden location in the Borders.


 

Over a four-year period from 2018, the scheme aims to introduce between five and 10 young eagles south and single eagle chicks from the broods in the Highlands will also be raised and released at a hidden location in the Borders.

Naturalists have made a 'monster' discovery in an old coal mine, says the Daily Mail.

A species of millipede, called the Maerdy Monster, described as 'new to science' was found under a pile of stones at Maerdy Colliery in the Rhondda Valleys of South Wales.

The brown, 4cm-long arthropod was named in honour of the pit which closed in 1990 - one of the last working pits in the Welsh coalfield.

Scientist Liam Olds said: “It's not every day that you find a species new to science. It shows you don't have to go to the Amazon to find new things.”


 

Fancy working for the Queen? According to the Daily Mirror, the British monarch is hiring a cushion and curtain-maker to create and take care of bespoke furnishings in Buckingham Palace Windsor Castle and St James's Palace.

The Royal Household has advertised the full-time position online, telling prospective employees that it is a chance to leave their mark on 'some of the most famous houses in the world."


 

An article in the Daily Express explains that monks in Somerset have found an antique list of recipes in Downside Abbey which contains one of the first ever mentions of curry in England.

The cook book, dating back to 1793, was used to make a variety of dishes, including “calves head turtle fashion” and “fricassee of pigs feet and ears”.

The curry’s ingredients are a mix between spices that were common in the UK, like curry powder or sugar, and some rare seasonings, which came to Bristol via the slave trade triangle between Africa, Europe and the Americas.


 

There are some fascinating historical items on display at the National Army Museum in London which has re-opened after a three year £23.75 million redevelopment, says The Guardian.

They include the Duke of Wellington’s cloak, the skeleton of Napoleon’s horse, Lawrence of Arabia’s robes, the cloak worn by the man who carried the order to the front for the Charge of the Light Brigade, and a twisted piece of shrapnel from an encounter 11 years ago in Helmand province in Afghanistan.

Museum director Janice Murray commented: “I don’t think that you can understand British history if you don’t understand the history of the British army – the British army in many ways has shaped the country we are living in today.”


 

Didcot in Oxfordshire is the most 'normal' English town, reports The Independent.

The outline data science research carried out by ASI Data Science which shows that Didcot is the place that most closely mirrors English national demographics and opinion.


 

Ninety three year old hairdresser Kathleen Privett is hanging up her scissors after 72 years working in the same salon in Portsmouth, Hampshire, completing over 220,000 hair cuts.

The Daily Mirror reports that Kathleen began working with her father in 1945, helping him out along with her sister Mavis when he was short staffed.

She took over the running of the Maison Drayton salon after he passed away in 1962.

Kathleen commented: “I may not have done as many haircuts in recent years, but I still went to the salon every day. Some of my customers have been with me for around 50 years, they really are like a family.”


 

Reference list:

The Express (www.express.co.uk)

The Guardian (www.guardian.co.uk)

The Independent (www.independent.co.uk)

Daily Mail (www.dailymail.co.uk)

Daily Mirror (www.mirror.co.uk)