APPARENTLY the odds on this are a quintillion to one, so John Landy certainly had a surprise when he opened a box of 10 eggs to find that they all had double yolks.

He bought them during a visit to a supermarket near his home in Wigan, Lancashire.

John told the Daily Mirror: “When I got one double yolk, I was quite surprised because I had never see one before. I opened another one and that was one. We were having four eggs and they were all double yolkers. I decided to open the rest of the eggs and they were all double yolks.”

---------------------------------------------------------

They sat in a barn untouched for decades but now four vintage motorcycles and sidecars are to be auctioned in Warrington, Lancashire.

According to the Daily Express, the vehicles, which date from the 1920s and 30s, could fetch a combined price of more than £50,000.

They are a 1924 AJS Model D Combo, a 1930 BSA Sloper Combo, a 1925 Quadrant Combo and a 1932 BSA G12 Combo used by police in Bath, Somerset.

Mark Bryan, motorcycle specialist at auctioneer H&H, which is selling the vehicles, said: “I would have been elated to find one of these old sidecars but to find four was astonishing.  I could barely believe it at first, sometimes you just get lucky.”

---------------------------------------------------------

The Daily Mirror informs us that a database is being built of strange carvings known as witches' marks.

Members of the public are being asked to share details and photos of any ritual protection symbols they come across which can be found in medieval houses and historic places like the Tower of London.

The markings are mainly from 1550 to 1750 when there was widespread belief in witchcraft and the supernatural .

Duncan Wilson, chief executive of Historic England, the government's heritage agency, said: "Witches' marks are a physical reminder of how our ancestors saw the world.”

---------------------------------------------------------

The Guardian reports that around 400 paintings, sculptures, design objects and other items by artists such as Damien Hirst and Jean-Michel Basquiet which were owned by the singer David Bowie and which are due to be sold by Sotheby's, are to go on public display for 10 days including one all-night session.

There will also be talks from people who knew the late singer including playwright Enda Walsh and novelist William Boyd.

Simon Hucker, Sotheby’s senior specialist in modern and postwar British art, said Bowie was drawn to artists with whom he had a connection – often outsiders trying to break with the past.

---------------------------------------------------------

Student Katherine Reid's first ever visit to a bingo hall ended with her winning a £16,000 car even though she can't drive!

The Daily Mirror says that 20 year old Katherine was handed the keys to a brand new Volkswagen Beetle after hitting the jackpot on her first session.

The University of Southampton student was visiting a friend in Cardiff when they decided to go for a round of bingo.

Katherine said: “I thought bingo was going to be boring but it was really rowdy. We’d spent a few hours drinking and having a laugh because we hadn’t even been close to winning anything the whole night. Then suddenly on the last game my numbers started coming up one by one. I shouted ‘full house’ and got on stage and the DJ told me I had won a car.”

---------------------------------------------------------

A British dairy farm has become the first in the world to employ a robot to rotate its award-winning cheddar cheese, reports the Daily Express.

The machine at Westcombe Dairy in Shepton Mallet, Somerset, upends 5,000 wheels of cheddar stacked 12 shelves high, picking up each lump before brushing off excess mould and turning them over.

It has been called Tina the Turner and dairy owner Tom Calver said: “Turning cheese is an incredibly mundane job and you don't come across too many people who aspire to be a cheese turner.”

---------------------------------------------------------

Perhaps not surprisingly “Brexit” (the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union) has been named the word of the year by dictionary publisher Collins.

An article in The Guardian says that Brexit saw its first recorded usage in 2013, but has since increased in use by more than 3,400% this year.

Collins says such an increase is “unheard of” since it began monitoring word usage.

 

Reference list:

The Express (www.express.co.uk)

The Guardian (www.guardian.co.uk)

Daily Mirror (www.mirror.co.uk)