Language Articles

Linguists are full of theories about how people learn – the use of short term and long term memory, how the brain encodes ideas, the use of menomics and lots more complicated gumph. You don’t need to know all that to learn a language. What you do need is to hear it and to try it out, and this isn’t too hard – ask any two year old.

Read more: Learning Techniques - Language Article

An index, while never the glamorous part of any writing project, is essential to the readability and usability of longer non-fiction and technical works. Building one need not be a chore, but it should not be an afterthought either. Here's how to make an index useful to readers without it becoming an unduly large project:-

1. Understand the purpose of an index. An index is an alphabetical listing of key words and concepts in the text. It contains "pointers" to those words and concepts, which are usually page, section, or paragraph numbers. An index generally appears at the end of a document or book. This is distinct from a table of contents, a bibliography, or other supporting materials.

2. Begin with a completed text. If the text is not yet complete, you can still begin the process of building an index as long as the text has most of its final structure.

Read more: How to Write an Index - Language Article

 

There are lots of different words to describe emptiness or fullness, try to spot them in this article:-
 
I did that necessary, but not very interesting, job this week, of clearing out my freezer. It was quite iced up and every little bit of ice had to be removed, otherwise it would become the focus of a new build up. I’ve got three freezers – one more of less dedicated to vegetarian food for one member of the family, another that was here when we arrived with rather silly drawers that jam if you put in more than the minimum, and the big one – a huge chest freezer, it could even be described as copious,  to take all  the garden produce to last us until the next harvest. The problem is that we are surrounded with shops offering special offers and so my husband (and I, it must be admitted) keeps coming home with ‘bargains’ and ‘special offers’. We will eat them, but what do we do in the meantime with huge joints of beef and pounds of parsnips, packs of apricots and tubs fit to burst with goodies of all kinds?
Read more: Full to Bursting - Language Article

What Would We Do Without Grammar

No one is crazy about grammar, except me. It's a good thing because I teach grammar. It is the basis for all good writing. So between writing and teaching, I've learned to love those pesky words called hyperboles, similes, metaphors, and personification. Oh no, not those things again! Yes, those things again. They are the work horses of figurative speech.

Read more: Creating An Image With Words - Language Article