Culture Articles

Today I spent ages preparing a pie chart for college. And when I say “ages” I mean  ages. I followed the text book, but at times it said ‘Ask Excel Help’ – if I tell you that the instructions take up pages 139-181 you will have some idea of how complicated this can be. It was boring and frustrating, and it wasn’t helped by the fact that my husband is trying to put on a new door for our wet room right next door.  Lunch tasted all the better when both jobs were done.

Read more: Let Your Hair Down - Culture Article

 

When it comes to the last croissant we would probably share, or at least offer to do so, but there are other things that it is harder to share – a favourite sweet perhaps, the last square of chocolate.

I remember years ago in college there was only one slice of ham on the plate and eight people. All but one had had enough, but one person was still to take her second slice. She was Swiss and newly engaged, and as she reached out I couldn’t help teasing her ‘They say in England that if you take the last piece of food from the table you will never marry.’ She hesitated just for a moment and then declared ‘Oh, such nonsense.’ before taking the first bite-full.  

Read more: The Last Rolo - Culture Article

Not far from here there are many caves once inhabited by early man and his ancestors.  You can go to a park where you suddenly come across a model of a sabre toothed tiger or a bear hunt. Deep in the caves stalagmites stand and stalactites drip slowly.  There are some 50 such sites in France and others in Spain and elsewhere.  Someone is making a lot of money with exorbitantly high entry fees. I prefer to stand on a hillside or by a lake and view  a landscape hardly different from those times.

Read more: Grotty grottoes - Culture Article

To cut down, can mean to fell, as in cutting down a tree, but it can also mean to reduce, and in the recession lots of people are having to cut down on stuff.

When I visited my gran, usually once a week, I used to get 6d from her: Half of this, 3d, would go into the bank and the other half on a cone from the Italian café next door to gran's.  When I was about seven my father began to give me pocket money too, but it was rather erratic, and asking for it was one sure way of ensuring it would not be forthcoming. Most weeks it was a shilling – that was 6d for the Saturday morning cinema, 3d for a comic to read and swap, and 3d for sweets. No thought of saving any of this entered my head. However, if I was given extra money then I would be allowed to spend some, but most had to be saved. So, for most of my life I’ve been a saver. 

Read more: Cutting Down - Culture Article